LiquidStack Builds First Large-Scale US Data Center to Use 2-Phase Immersion Cooling – Environment + Energy Leader

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LiquidStack has partnered with colocation data center provider Standard Power to build the first large-scale colocation data center in the US to use 2-phase immersion cooling. Standard Power provides Infrastructure as a Service to advanced data processing companies, including blockchain mining and high performance computing applications. LiquidStack says the facility will help many Midwest enterprises utilizing data-intense technologies – including colocation, edge computing, cryptocurrency miners, hi-flux microprocessors, GPUs, ASICs, AI Accelerators, and 5G applications – connect locally for “unparalleled performance and cost savings.”

In 2020, Submer explained liquid cooling as “the practice of submerging computer components (or full servers) in a thermally, but not electrically, conductive liquid (dielectric coolant). Liquid submersion is a routine method of cooling large power distribution components such as transformers. Still rarely used for the cooling of IT Hardware, this method is slowly becoming popular with innovative datacenters the world over.”

Since then, 2-phase immersion cooling has rapidly gained attention and market share as an alternative to transitionary liquid cooling technologies such as direct-to-chip (cold plates) and 1-phase immersion cooling. LiquidStack pioneered 2-phase liquid immersion cooling in 2012 to mine Bitcoin in Hong Kong and subsequently delivered its DataTank systems to several 160MW+ hyperscale mining sites in Europe. In 2019, the company pivoted its focus to data centers, edge and high performance computing applications. LiquidStack’s portfolio of solutions provide heat rejection capacity, energy efficiency, water use and space reduction, and CAPEX and OPEX savings. 

The new facility will also feature the DataTank 48U, LiquidStack’s offer for centralized and regional data centers. The DataTank 48U features up to 252kW capacity and provides performance and financial benefits, the company says. These include: 28 times more heat rejection capacity than air cooling; 41% reduction in energy use vs. air cooling; lowest pPUE of any form of data center cooling (as low as 1.02); zero water consumption; up to 60% white space and 69% land use savings, and a 33% improvement in total cost of ownership over three. years, the company says.

This data center comes at a time when liquid cooling is gaining more traction. With a focus on using green data centers to manage costs and efficiency, and to reduce the carbon footprint of energy intensive technological advances, demand for the liquid cooling market is expected to grow to $31 billion at a CAGR of nearly 26% from 2022 to 2032, according to a recent Persistence Market Research report. 

Many data centers are looking to cut down on water consumption. US electricity demand is expected to rise 7.3% over two decades — and water usage will rise as a result. Governments and businesses are now calling for concerted conservation efforts and technological advances. 

This UrIoTNews article is syndicated fromGoogle News