Edge Computing – Where Does It Fit Today And Tomorrow! – CIO Review

Adel Bekhiet, Senior Director of Infrastructure & Cloud Services, Northwestern Mutual

Adel Bekhiet, Senior Director of Infrastructure & Cloud Services, Northwestern Mutual

As we all experienced in the most recent number of years, technology has advanced and evolved very rapidly at a very scary pace, which makes it extremely hard to follow, adopt and keep track of its rate of change. In addition to that, a lot more has changed due to the COVID-19 pandemic that we have been dealing with this past couple of years, which has changed the way we work, the roles we play and the different virtual but creative ways we had to adopt to interact with each other safely and effectively and deliver value to our businesses and customers.

Nowadays, and more so than ever before, IT professionals will need to be fully aware, and up to date with all types of technology trends and advancements. In addition, they need to rapidly upskill and gain the necessary knowledge that can help them adopt and make the right choices to leverage such advancements to their benefit and be able to address customer needs in a very timely and efficient fashion.

Edge computing is one of those technologies that is growing at a very fast pace and has gained a lot of attention and momentum in the past couple of years, although the roots of edge computing go back to the late 90’s, it is only recently where many industries and research groups interest in edge computing has grown substantially for good reasons.

  ​Edge Computing will grow substantially in the next few years
to come, especially in the areas of Analytics and IoT   

As the volume of information and data we are dealing with continues to grow and explode due to the increased usage of Analytics, Artificial intelligence (AI), Internet of Things (IoT), and the various means of mobile devices and solutions, Edge computing started to gain a lot of popularity and wide adoption due to the fact that it does effectively address and solve processing latency and potential time consuming bandwidth delay issues with cloud computing and traditional datacenters, which is very true, especially for production, time sensitive processes and data needs in remote, distributed, and global locations.

I truly believe Edge Computing will grow substantially in the next few years to come, especially in the areas of Analytics and IoT, and as mobile devices become more and more intelligent and independent enough to operate on their own and make impactful decisions without having the need to continuously connect to a central location or a common platform somewhere on the public or private cloud. Such growing and emerging technology will deliver a very highly responsive services for mobile devices, and data privacy policy enforcement for edge Analytics and Internet of Things solutions, and the ability to mask any potential cloud outages and overcome them in a very timely and effective manner

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